Dating lingo fwb

Here, 99 texting acronyms and expressions that every parent should know. Of course, lots of text speak will vary by region or even school or peer group.

Sounds pretty straightforward, you’d think; but these days, dating language has evolved so you can specify a whole range of requests for that potentially perfect partner – and some if it is, shall we say, quite frank! And in this busy, fast paced world, sometimes you want to try out a few partners before you settle with just one; so lots of people look for a FWB – a ‘friend with benefits’, who you can see only when it suits you, with no real commitment, and without getting emotionally involved.It’s mainly the younger generation who like abbreviations and text speak, as it’s just quicker and easier; anyone over the age of 30 or so probably won’t encounter this as much.’ Even so, here are a couple you should probably be aware of; if the other party asks you to DTR, it means they want to ‘Define the Relationship’, and find out where exactly it’s going…if it’s not a long-term thing, you can just reply YOYO: ‘You’re On Your Own! Harsh, perhaps, but it saves a lot of time in the long run. Texting, Twitter, chat and IM abbreviations and acronyms represent people's shorthand communications via mobile devices and on the Internet, especially on social media platforms.Although critics have called this anything from an “utopist idea” to “an easy way for men to get what they want without having to pay for it,” it turns out that the FWB method isn’t a bad way to begin a long-term relationship.According to a University of Louisville study published in Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, exclusive romances that begin as “friends with benefits,” characterized by sexual encounters with no commitment, are actually no more likely to fail than those than started out as committed relationships.